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already cancelling flights. even talk about shutting down the new york transit. hurricane irene wasn't that bad. i'm not going to worry this time, sam. >> dan, we were right over here. the thing about hurricane irene, we got to remember, it was a very bad storm, it brought a lot of rain and a lot of flooding to inland areas. it didn't do the coastal damage. all of the problems that you could have with this system, coastal damage is just one, then you have rain, wind and then flooding. in this case, you have snow as well. you got those five points. maybe one point wasn't as bad in irene in the biggest part of new york. but i'll tell you in the biggest population center of new york, but that was a bad storm for a lot of folks. be prepared for this storm to have a stronger coastal effects. it may be more wind and more rain if these forecasters are right this morning. our ginger zee is right now in atlantic city, where they're getting ready for that. i remember that coastline, it barely ramps out from the water to where those casinos are, good morning. >> i have lost everything. i have n
, ladies and gentlemen, i stood in this very spot a year ago for hurricane irene. there were some similar dire warnings then, and when the storm came, it actually leapfrogged over new york city and landed further up the hudson river and caused considerable damage there, although we didn't know it as the storm was happening and one of the things i've learned in 40 years of coverage these events is that it is always worse than it initially seems because you begin to tally the damage once daylight comes and once things get more calm. but this will not be like a traditional hurricane, this will not be something that happens in six or eight hours and then we're on with our lives and this is an enduring event, it is the collision of the three big weather systems, the tropical hurricanes, the frigid winds coming down from the north and that western low pressure system, everything's going to get churned around and it's going to be part of our lives, unfortunately, for several days, and i think, i fear that before this is over, it's going to be a story with many, many tragic ramifications. but sta
the winners, so to speak, and the losers because it is asymmetric, right? >>> now last year hurricane irene's initial projections were $7 billion. turned out to be $15 billion. there were a lot of ancillaries once the checks come out from the government and private insurers. stimulus to the gdp. not big enough to move the needle. this one we're getting initial projections is much bigger. the two cohorts in stocks most impacted the home depot-like places, let's call them that, they were basically moved up a day ahead of the storm and then pulled off once the market turned out to be. >> we didn't see much of that on friday in terms of home depot or at lowe's which i thought was interesting and most of the retailers have closed their books on saturday, last saturday, so the impact of the storm won't actually be seen until the following quarter or the next month when they report retail sales. lowe's is the exception. they closed books on saturday. all the runup, the generators they've sold, the batteries, the flashlights, those things were almost sold out pretty much across the board. that shou
here, the effects of sandy, are already worse than what we saw with irene. >> absolutely. absolutely. >> now, you see you have packed up the dog. you were under a mandatory evacuation, but you did decide to wait until this moment. did you think that there was a time you could actually ride it out? >> yeah. >> we did until the winds really started picking up. the tide wasn't going out at all, and it was well past high tide. >> i think a lot of public officials are going to be glad that you are heeding the warning and deciding to get out. i'm going to let you get on with your boat. thank you very much for waiting. suzanne, i also want you to take a look down the street here. the guy that you see in the scuba gear, his name is paul. he is a lifeguard. paul, come on over here and talk to me here for a moment. take off the goggles and what not. i know you have been down here in the neighborhood. you've been monitoring things. obviously, you're dressed appropriately for the occasion, but i know a lot of public officials want folks like you to head on out. >> um, yes. however, i'm real clos
bad trouble. >> reporter: last year during tropical storm irene the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. now sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many experts predicted. some people like this family who live in the evacuation zone are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> diapers, water, just, you know hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines at the supermarket. >> madhouse today. >> reporter: the streets are crackling with an upbeat preapocalyptic vibe. >> new yorker, what are you going to do? we are a new yorker. >> hard not to enjoy her spirit. the new york stock exchange will be closed. they're worried about keeping the power on all day long. dan harris, abc news, new york. >> it's lick thke that, new yor. keep on trucking. my drugstore was empty. our extreme weather team watching the maps and computer models overnight. >> meteorologist jim dickey joining us this morning with the very latest. what do you have, jim? >> well, sandy continues
, when hurricane irene came through and the flooding that i've seen down to my left here, going out underneath the boardwalk, out on the streets where all the homes are on long beach is already much, much worse than irene. further left, because of the conditions here and the camera angle, you can't see it. but there is a lifeguard station that last year 14 months ago in irene was swept off its foundation. it's done it again. the authorities have been appealing to people all day to get out. get out of long beach a get across the bridge. >> bret: stay safe. we will head further south and correspondent steve harrigan is in ocean city, maryland. good evening, steve. >> good evening, bret. hurricane force winds here cracking over the seawall. 15 to 20-foot waves. part of the pier has been destroyed by the waves. the governor making a forceful statement saying stay in your house. this storm is going to kill people. we want to limit the loss of life. stay in the house. as many as 30,000 people now without power. as the conditions are likely to continue to get worse throughout the night. br
. >> reporter: sandy could create a storm surge larger than last year's hurricane irene. possibly filling the subway tunnels with water. >> lower manhattan is the most vulnerable spot for a storm surge. >> no doubt about they expect this to be a large problem for central new jersey, including philadelphia, atlantic city, new york city all of the way up toward boston. something that we need to pay attenti attention to. >>> now, potentially new york city, where hurricane irene last year wasn't so bad in the city itself, what would you say to people who are tempted to write this off? >> i want to remind folks about that hurricane, it was a bad storm, dan, it just didn't deliver the wind damage that new york city expected and the surge wasn't really here. but if you look inland where it was catastrophic flooding and so many folks were acted that storm. it was a terrible storm. this storm hurricane center said that it will have all of those elements focused on these big population areas, and new york city is one of them. i'm going to ask everyone to be prepared. >> all right, better safe than
feet higher than the water level was with irene, august a year ago. we're staying hunkered down and bringing pictures the best we can. >> we appreciate that, mike, i don't have to tell you the real estate there is hugely valuable for the state of new jersey. it is a recreational playground all summer for millions of american families. what is high tide where you are? is this the after-effect of the mean high tide on the jersey shore? >> reporter: yeah, the high tide is occurring right about now. it ranges generally between 8-8:30 between atlantic city and up here. so it is occurring right now. so we would suspect, now that the storm has gone inland, and the winds generally -- eventually will come around offshore, that it won't get much worse than this. the water won't get much higher. but again, it is already two and a half to three feet higher, at least at sandy hook than it was with irene. so that puts that in perspective. and i think when we get first flight tomorrow you will see how the entire coastline has been re-arranged from the entire storm. >> i think my wife and i had
year, hurricane irene had less than five feet of surge. but that made driving through the wall street area an adventure. new york city is lucky to have the high-rises. be very clear. this ain't irene. the water will come. could be 8, 10, 12 feet high. as brave as you are, we won't be here tomorrow morning in this spot. >> we won't. a lot of tourists are out now, now gnat we have daylight out. there's much more of the storm to come. we'll cover it all morning long. >> let's take a look at the tourists. times square normally crammed with traffic at this time. people out there walking around, taking it all in. sandy has forced new york city officials to shut down the subways for the second time in in city's history. josh, a lot fewer people than usual. >> it's not just less crowded. everything here is shuttered. the winds pick up the rain again starts to fall. this is a subway station closed for business. not the only station that is. every station throughout the city is closed as new york prepares for the superstorm. this morning, the largest transit system in the country closed down. t
unprecedented proportions. to put things in perspective. hurricane irene which you can see her on the right caused nearly $16 billion in damage and take a look at sandy in comparison. with sandy expected to linger over the northeast for days one can only imagine if the difference in size will reflect the difference in damage. we'll have the latest on the storm track and its strength in one minute. rick? >> reporter: the winds have picked up even more from last hour. steady now in the 40s and 50s with gusts but feel like over 0 miles per hour. i can't even read the wind gauge or turn into the rain because rain and sand is pelting us it many pretty painful. we are just after low tide. so the surf i'll it's rough is not encroaching on the boardwalk at this point and ocean avenue is still relatively dry. but other roads in the community are under water and many other roads across the state of new jersey are hazardous. the garden state parkway has been closed from exit 63 south to cape may. that's a major highway in new jersey shut down because of flooding in both directions. in fact atlantic ci
manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and been devastating.us the damage that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today. the mayor again briefs in a matter of mome
and irene many did not see the extent of the damage coming. adam shapiro is doing looking for us. it will be flooding. that is what noaa is most concerned about. at 3:00 p.m. update they talked about the full moon and full moon cycles will create higher storm surge. what they can't say what part of the east coast will face the worst part of that storm surge. right now they are saying there is 90% certainty that the storm is doing, hurricane sandy right now, by the time it hits the united states or tropical storm or cyclone sandy, 90% certainty it will hit the united states monday night. once it hits and rain and rain and rain. according to noaa it will be a two or three day event tore most people, bringing in west virginia up to two feet of snow because it will impact with the other storm systemming coming out of the west. it is a cold front, when the cold front hits, snow in west virginia, snow in pennsylvania, snow in ohio. up to eight inches in pennsylvania and ohio. analysis from noaa, says roughly 10 inches of rain. hurricane irene dumped a lot of water on new jersey, vermon
much for the water to come up over the walls. last year, for hurricane irene, these residents had to be evacuated. this time around, they're ready for the worst. east coast communities going on the offensive. building sand walls, securing property and stocking up on supplies, as the superstorm closes in. after being pounded last year by hurricane irene with its record storm surge and feet of flooding, new york residents are once again bracing for the worst. damage from irene topped $14 billion. and sandy could wreak even more havoc. >> i lost everything in my basement. i had up to ten feet of water in my house. this is a concern. >> reporter: governor cuomo has declared a state of emergency in preparation for sandy's impact. and mayor michael bloomberg warned new york city residents to brace themselves. >> high winds that could force certain bridges to be closed. >> reporter: last year, in advance of irene, mayor bloomberg made the unprecedented order to evacuate low-lying areas of the city and shut down the subway system. as sandy barrels north, the city's more than 7 million str
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
seen it. worse than irene. this is a frustrating situation to him. it has all to do with underground infrastructure. i shouldn't say only because that would be a record breaking storm surge. we had one that was higher than that. that's the main reason that it will take so long. >> some of those areas deliberately shut down power out of precaution. explain what happened. >> it is convenient because you don't have wires aboveground. but during a flooding situation that can spell big problems and it did. so they will shut down some of the stations as a precautionary measure and saeal them off so they don't get the corrosive salt water in there. they judged it on the past historic storms and built it higher than that. that's exactly what sandy brought them. so an unprecedented event and something that really they didn't plan for. i asked them are you going to look into upgrading that? that would cost serious dollars but he did acknowledge, that's a question that certainly has to be discussed. >> i know you have spoken with a lot of new yorkers. how are they reacting? especially the lower
nervous. >> you think it's going to be bad? >> i think so. >> i'm worried. we lucked out with irene, and i don't know. this may be worse. >> nbc's tom strong traung is l rehoboth beach, delaware. any residents left? >> they have about eight hours, the governor issues a mandatory evacuation area. everybody must be out by 8:00. look down the beach, have you several dozen people trying to get their last glimpse. right now, low tide. looks pretty impressive. come high tide, around 6:30, it wouldn't be a surprise if we didn't see water coming up to this fence here. all around rehoboth beach, a lot of businesses boarded up. people making runs to the grocery store, water short, bread is short. people did what they could in terms of preparation. they had about eight hours, around that time, this area will be shut down. cut off the bridges and roads into here it won't be a very pleasant place to stay if the electricity is going to go out. which is a likelihood. 2,000 utility workers and we're talking about the maryland/dc area, baltimore areas, and states of emergencies in those areas as well. a lo
, and the like. just to give you some perspective, last year, during irene, large sections of roads were washed away here in north carolina. power was knocked out to about half a million people, and seven people died. so, even -- and that was a low-end storm. i wouldn't really read in to much to the fact that this is a tropical storm or a low-end hurricane. either way the effects are going to be devastating and now is the time when people really do need to prepare, alex. >> i'm glad you're putting that reminder out there. it's absolutely true. just because it says tropical storm right now, don't let your guard down. julie martin, thanks for watching things for us from north carolina. we're going to check back in with dylan dreyer at the bottom of the hour for the very latest on the path of the storm. al roker will also be coming our way from delaware. >>> back to politics now. today republican presidential nominee mitt romney heads for florida to campaign with senator marco rubio. governor romney and vice presidential candidate paul ryan had a big rally in ohio, and today congressman ryan is on
deep. that water has now come up, and we're well above the levels that we were during hurricane irene. that was expected as the storm surge now comes in, and as i said the wind picks up, and it's going to get worse as the -- as the evening goes on. all of the bridges now in and out of manhattan closed. the east river and the hudson river as well as the verazzano bridge that connects brooklyn and staten island. manhattan literally is now an island. there is also now the concern that conedison the local utility has raise that had they may have to do preemptive power outages, if it looks like some of the low-lying areas are going to flood to protect the underground equipment. they would do power outages, so so much for the utility of having utilities and elect call wires under a ground. that can be an issue as well when storm surges rise. we'll be back with more as our special coverage goes on. guys, back to you. >> thank you so much, scott. that's why we have so many issues with the exchange. that's the neighborhood where the new york stock exchange is. back to the dramatic picture in m
mean, twhapd during irene? >> caller: well, i have to tell you, i was here personally, the same way. and probably, it was exactly the same scenario. i think most people are heeding the warning and are staying home and staying put. and that's allowing them to stay safe and not, you know, causing the unnecessary injury or illness from occurring. >> yeah. similarity. so, so far, so good, right? >> caller: so far, so good. we are keeping our fingers crossed. like i said, we have extra staff on board tonight. everybody's bunking out at the hospital. we are waiting to see, you know, if we are needed. >> doctor, this is heather, i did want to ask you a question. i know you don't want to talk specifically about the situation right now at the new york medical center where they are evacuating people. but what happens when have you patients who are on ventilators? they have at least four infants on ventilator there is. they are having to evacuate them and take them out of the hospital, carry patients down the stairwells. how do do you that? >> caller: well, very carefully, obviously. but what
on the boardwalk. many people have heeded the warnings. they are remembering what happened with irene last year. other people are saying, you know, we have been through the storms before. we are hunkering down and we are not leaking. of course, our fingers are crossed for them. connell: along the shoreline, for better or worse with a large group of people. dagen: breaking news on the water moving into new york city and manhattan our sister station is reporting that parts of fdr drive, this is one of the two main arteries in and out of new york city that runs along the edge of manhattan. on the east side of manhattan is fdr drive, that is now underwater according to fox five. fdr drive is on the east side of manhattan. this is a critical artery of moving traffic in and out of new york city. at 2:00 p.m. eastern time, both the holland and brooklyn battery tunnel will be closing. if people are not in the city or out of the city in a matter of hours, you will not have a choice. you will have to stay right where you are. dagen: if you went up the right side of the horseshoe there, the east river is
every community is at least 75% or more out at this hour and as we saw with irene and then with the october snowstorm, it can take a long time, perhaps a week or even nine or ten days before the power gets restored for a lot of these folks. >> and that is the latest from old saybrook, connecticutment we want to go back to cape may, new jersey. we told you this is a continually developing story and more weather effects being felt although the worst is over. jay gray is there and i understand it started raining again. >> reporter: yeah, chris, we have seen a little more rain dropping in which is exactly what they don't need in this small community. there's already been some flooding problems. that's going to continue obviously as the advance of rain moves through and really it's slowing down the effort to get out and assess the situation. we're also really seeing intense winds that continue to whip around this area. there is some damage to buildings in the city. there's some damage to the infrastructure here. but, again, we can't get to exactly how much damage becaus
to compare it to would be eirene. i was here in new york for irene last year. this is much much worse than irene. much larger storm. not necessarily a stronger storm but because it is so large it has this tremendous amount of energy with it. all of that energy can do quite a bit of damage. when the sun comes up today we are going to get a good idea as to the real full extent of what actually happened over the past 24-hours. >>> that is for sure. this has been so large up and down the east coast. it has been as far west as chicago with 20-foot waves in lake michigan. >> all day and all night you have been sending us the pictures of the storm. >> i live in long island on the north shore of long island. you have been hearing about that. look at all of the downed trees this is in my house alone. last half this is before everybody went to bed last night we had lost 5 trees. these are 100 foot tall or hire trees. a lot of people have been sending us in their photos and videos. this is also on the long island sound. things are a real mess out there. heather childers joins us with a look at some o
storms in 1878 and 1903 and then hurricane irene became a tropical storm when it hit just last year. now, hurricane irene caused roughly $15 billion in damage all across the northeast. the state of new jersey alone got $275 million in federal assistance most going to homeowners and flooding private insurers. here in cape may, commercial fishing is the big business. a billion dollars in revenue for new jersey. further up atlantic city of course we know all of those casinos, 12 flagship institutions across the boardwalk are closed and halloween parties canceled. atlantic city is lower lying. that will be a very, very big hit. the place to watch. evacuated yesterday by 4:00 p.m. and chris christie declaring a state of emergency there because of how bad conditions are supposed to get there. it's only 9:00 a.m. right now. you can see how bad it's getting. the waves are spilling up into the dunes and there is flooding in the street. there's structural damage just a couple blocks away that we'll check out. definitely a strengthening storm here on the shore of new jersey. carl? >> kayla, thank y
of the power outages. that is twice the number of houses impacted by hurricane irene last year. at least 18 deaths reported in seven states. for a little more perspective, how about this? one in six people are without power in new york, pennsylvania and new jersey. in new jersey we find ron, a spokesperson for new jersey power and light. what are you dealing with right now? >> we're dealing with outages to more than 930,000 customers. that is a significant portion of the 1.1 million customers we serve throughout the state. jenna: we saw that explosion at the substation. it was a big dramatic moment that affected power in the city of manhattan. did you have something similar out in new jersey? what caused the power outages? >> we did not have something similar to that we took some of the substations in barrier island communities and coastal communities off-line for safety reasons last night. our biggest concern is damage to our transmission lines of the we've started our assessment process and the winds will cooperate a little bit today we'll get helicopters up in the air to do an aerial ass
. >> that is true. what happened is we had a combination of hurricane irene and hurricane lee. that happened in 1955 with tremendous amounts of water build up. but in this case, it is the storm surge that did the dirty work because the way turned into the coast. again, i want to stress to people that heat and drought and hurricanes along the eastern seaboard are something we will have to deal with for the next several years because of the overall pattern. cooling pacific very warm and women. then we will be back to where we were in the 60s and 70s again. dagen: left hook of the storm, the ride home untransformed hitting us in new york city. if anything, on the jersey shore, that is different than hurricane irene when we saw it. >> that is exactly right. the hurricane is pushing a hand of water up through. in the 1938 hurricane, it doesn't bring a whole heck of a lot. from the storm passed to the left, it does. 15 feet of water in providence, rhode island. imagine that. 3800 of an inch of rain. less than connecticut, all through the delaware valley, tremendous flooding going on there. the same type o
hurricane irene, we achieved a 98% evacuation rate. but for whatever reason, this time, we haven't reached that number yet. we think we're somewhere having evacuated several thousand people. but we still have too many people in atlantic city. that creates a very uncomfortable situation for all of our emergency responders and officials are still trying to do the best we can to get people out of harm's way. >> mayor, ali velshi is on the streets of atlantic city. right now, the winds are obviously very gusty. ali, you have a question you'd like to ask the mayor. >> reporter: yes, i do, mayor. and the important thing is by looking at atlantic city, people can look at this and say, this might happen in my community. if you're still not evacuated, what do you do? i know people are driving around. they can get out in their car but it's gusty and dangerous. should people leave and go to a shelter now or hunker down and stay? >> at this point, i think they would be best served to stay at home and hunker down. i just visited a couple of our shelters. i had a very difficult time getting back to wher
of that was west of the coast, at least where i was we didn't get the rain we got with irene, not even close. >> right, we were most concerned about the flooding because of the tidal action. right there, yeah, the surge, we have wonderful beaches and between dewey beach and bethany beach we had to close route 1. there are a lot of others we had to close throughout the state. the bay communities were hit hard but we've got people out looking right now. we think we escaped the worst of it. >> and total cost for delaware, any idea yet in. >> we don't know. we have people as we say looking right now, i think it will take us a little while to figure that out. certainly concerned about the 44,000 families without power but we're obviously looking forward to utility crews getting out there as soon as, once conditions permit them to be out there. they can't be in harm's way if the winds are too high. >> for your state was this not as significant or not as negative of an outcome as irene, governor? >> well, i mean i'd put it this way we have a lot of flooding and we do have 40,000 plus people without
. and we went through hurricane irene, tropical storm irene last year, this time last year. but this is a lot worse as far as storm surge down here. again, right now we also know that 400,000 people about are without power here in connecticut. very dire situation. the governor briefing the media in just a little while up in hartford. that's the latest down here in new haven, connecticut. back to you. >> thank you. it's always deadly to underestimate the power of one of those storms. let's turn things over to meteorologist rob mayeda. we're anticipating that bad weather is going to move into that area soon. >> it is approaching from the south. right now, certainly delaware, new jersey and new york seeing the worst of the former hurricane, now just a supercharged nor'easter that is crossing the coast. winds sustained at 80 miles per hour. we have seen gusts closer to 90 miles an hour on long island. everything in purple would be wind gusts at about hurricane strength. that's a large area being impacted there. as that wall of water being pushed by the winds, over the last 24 t
whether to shut down any public transportation as it did during irene. airlines are predicting cancellations and waiving change fees for passengers who want to reschedule. stay with 11 news for the latest on hurricane sandy, get updates on live wire and see how to prepare for power outages, on wbaltv.com and our mobile app. >> 5:09 and 59 degrees at b.w.i. hurricane sandy scrambles the final full week of campaigning for the presidential candidates. how both candidates are making the most of their time. >> cubans clean up after the destruction sandy left behind. >> tony has the latest on sandy in the insta-weather plus forecast next. stay with us. beep-bop-boop-bop boop-beep. [monotone] she says, "switch to progressive and you could save hundreds." call or click today. denny's everyday value slam egis four dollars every day. wait, is that right? eggs, bacon, pancakes. yeah. that's right. the four dollar everyday value slam. only four dollars every day. only at denny's. vo: for cold and flu season, honey, don't use your sleeve. there's clorox bleach. music: guitar, clapping and m
larger than anything we have experienced most recently, like irene. richard? >> erica, keep it safe out there. >>> today people living in the district can pick up sandbags to protect their homes from flooding. d.c.'s department of public works will hand out sandbags at the tacoma park center. d.c. residents can stop by from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. to pick up their sandbags. there is a five-bag limit per car. >>> throughout our area people are preparing for the worst, not only stocking up for the possibility of long power outages but in some neighborhoods they're bracing for flooding. news 4's jackie bensen reports. >> reporter: in the huntington section of fairfax county it's a tense game of watching and waiting. this flyer was hand delivered to every home in the area which has been devastated regularly by flooding, warning residents to be prepared. as recently as august, residents of this neighborhood were pumping water out of their basements. >> we've been preparing for a couple days. >> reporter: at twins ace hardware store on main street in fairfax, you can tell what people need by
say it can be worse than irene. >> don't pay attention to it being downgraded. it doesn't mean anything. it's not really completely a tropical storm. it's going to be transitioning to what we kind of consider a nor'easter. we are accustomed to nor'easters. that kind of a event. moisture associated with a tropical storm. tropical storm holds a lot more water in the atmosphere as it transitions. that water is still going to be there radar picture showing the rain is following across parts of the carolinas. the rain is going to be heavy all day. battering waves, a lot of wind. beach erosion and that sort of thing here. go forward on the track of this storm. continues to move northeast. takes this unprecedented left-hand hook. that's where we've begin to go through a transition to a different type of a storm. people are used to hurricanes strengthening when there is warm water. this isn't going to be strengthening for those purpose purposes. snran way a nor'easter strengthens. european model track shows this. right around parts of jiewj. i want to point out other things on this map
for a very long time because of a storm and it was just last year with hurricane irene that brought a lot of power outages for a very lengthy time to the state of connecticut. >> that's right, i would contrast this storm from the deratio we experienced this summer, where it same upon us all at once, we didn't have the time to stage our crews. this time we have several days warning, we're staging our crews, but again, this is going to be a very, very severe storm. mr. owens, meteorologist chad myers has a question for you. >> this is going to be one of those big storms, it's going to be windy for a long time and people are going to lose power at the beginning and are going to be very impatient in the beginning, and you won't put crews out there until what purpose? you're obviously not going to put men in bucks at 60? >> yes, we'll wait until the wind dies down. so obviously, we're only going to have those crews seek to restore service. you first have to assess the damage and we believe that there will be substantial physical destruction of our infrastructure, we're going to have to assess
in new york harbor right now, a half a foot higher than hurricane irene. when the high tide starts to flood in late this afternoon, early this evening, we'll see record-breaking surge hikes. >> does that mean water goes in the subway? >> probably. >> probably. >> i don't know what kind of sandbagging efforts that they're going to be having in place. i mean, since irene, i know they've taken some steps to see if they can get some sort of better protection from subway entrances, but the official forecast is calling for a 10 hfgs to 12-foot storm tide and it only needs to be 10.5 feet to flood the subway. >> jeff, we've seen the pictures. we keep hearing the adjectives colossal, gigantic, to describe it. almost in november, cold in the north. how does a storm like this size form? >> well, it started in the caribbean, which it's always warm enough year around to make hurricanes form. and once it got north of the caribbean it found itself right over the gulf stream, at least over the past day or so, and it was in a very unique spot, right over an axis of the warm gulf stream waters that
to last year's hurricane? >> the issue that the damage is more extensive than it was for irene. power. be a long time to at this point, i don't think it is a good estmaste. >> brian: your original estimate 7-10 days? >> that's right. that was too optmistic. >> steve: and any advice for people with a generator and watching this and wires down in the neighborhood? >> we'll be out patrolling and the public officials urge don't go outside and don't go near electric wires or downed wires. you don't know if it is a phone or cable wire you don't know if it is wrapped up in our wires down the line. >> brian: when something like this happens, is it worth calling to report or should we assume that everyone is down and we will get to you when we can. >> customers should report an out age and if it goes off report it afterwards. >> gretchen: a lot of people can do that on line as well. if they have computer service. >> brian: i another question for you . in terms of water receding, the worst is over and water is getting out of there, is that what you are seeing? >> brian: that's what we are see w
. no doubt about it. you look at hurricane irene, tropical storm irene, the cost to state and local governments of new york was $1.2 billion. that was for recovery and cleanup. clearly this is going to be an economic hit on us. dimensions of which we just don't know yet. >> it's interesting how it impacted with mta shut down and people unable to get into manhattan for example. lower manhattan almost deserted. certainly very few businesses operating and few businesses operating at night. how does that work its way through the economy? >> very significantly. we take for granted the extensive public transportation system we have in the new york city metropolitan area. it's the life blood to our economy. when that life blood is not pumping, it will have a serious impact. it's not just how soon will trains be running but will be repair costs? they will be significant. mta had its own financing troubles particularly with regard to that capital program. they obviously weren't anticipating the kind of damage that this storm has brought. a long-term where we're at with financing for the mta
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